Today: 04.Mar.2021

Michael Shellenberger, Founder-President of Environmental Progress: Global demand for electricity is set to rise 70% over the next 25 years. New nuclear reactor components can increasingly be mass-manufactured in factories and shipped around the world for reassembly on site. What’s at stake is a market worth $500 to $740 billion over the next decade and hundreds of thousands of high-skill and high-wage jobs. This essay applies to America and other countries who promote nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, and nuclear science for peaceful purposes. This new Atoms for Peace effort could inspire and unite the world around something almost everyone wants: cheap, clean energy and its beneficial and very valuable by-products and services.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Herve Nifenecker, honorary chairman of "Sauvons Le Climat" and colleagues in eight countries explain how solutions to the problem of climate change developed in the wake of requirements established by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) make various assumptions we might not be able to address. Attempting to capture and store carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels, coal, natural gas, and oil, in power stations and vehicles involves a massive geological-scale engineering effort even at today's emission rates based on rising energy requirements.

Published in France

Geoffrey Rothwell, Ph.D. Economics, Principal Economist at OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: This book is a unique introduction to the economics and economic uncertainties of nuclear electricity generation. It examines nuclear power’s complex relationships among financial, operational and regulatory cost drivers. It does so as a research monograph and as a textbook by modelling and explaining one of the world’s most opaque technologies using microeconomics, statistics and cost engineering.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Andrew Kenny, Nuclear Africa: Decommissioning of nuclear power plants is neither mysterious nor very expensive. In the USA, more than a dozen nuclear facilities have already been successfully decommissioned, and all around the world many more are being decommissioned or are about to be. New nuclear plants are easier to decommission than old ones, so as time passes the process of decommissioning will become easier and cheaper. Furthermore, as techniques improve, especially with the increased use of robotics instead of humans to dismantle the plants, costs will come down and exposure to radiation will decrease.

Published in South Africa