Today: 21.Apr.2021

Ward Whicker, Emeritus Professor of Radioecology - Global energy demands are at an unprecedented high and still growing. Global demand for electricity is projected to grow over 70 percent by 2035. Finding energy sources to power the world's growing population and economy and meet that demand cleanly and responsibly is part of an on-going debate. In spite of many advantages, some people have concerns about nuclear power generation. These fears trace largely to misguided assumptions concerning the actual environmental and health consequences from accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and, most recently, Fukushima.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Michael Fox, Emeritus Professor in Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences - Nuclear power may just be the most important solution to our search for clean, sustainable energy sources. Although wind and solar can contribute to our energy mix, we need a reliable source to meet large-scale energy demands. However, most people are wary, if not downright afraid, of nuclear power. It's time to clear up misconceptions and examine the science behind nuclear power, in order to determine what role it could and should play in our future. NOTE: There are supporters of nuclear energy on both sides of the Anthropogenic Global Warming, AGW, topic. The position of this website is that nuclear power is important to deal with climate change from all causes. See articles about AGW under the tab, ENVIRONMENT.

Published in USA

Rauli Partanen, independent author on energy and its role in the environment and modern society. Nuclear power in Sweden has become uneconomical. Wholesale prices of electricity in Sweden have been much lower than the break even price for nuclear generation. Electricity has been sold at a record low price of €20 per megawatt hour (MWh), while the cost of generating nuclear power has been in the same ballpark, or even slightly higher. In addition, the Swedish government has set a tax on nuclear power, which has been steadily rising. After the latest hike, it amounts to about a third of the wholesale price, roughly €7 per MWh.

Published in UK

Marita Noon, Advocate for sound energy policies and factual science, not computer models, based evaluation of CO2 from fossil fuels: On April 22, 2016 in a high-level celebration at the United Nations headquarters in New York, the Paris Climate Agreement of December, 2015 will officially be signed. Thirty days after its signing, the agreement will take effect—committing countries to establishing individual targets for emission reductions. Bureaucratically administered mandates, taxes, and special interest subsidies will drive family incomes down by thousands of dollars per year, drive up energy costs, and eliminate hundreds of thousands of jobs. All of these costs would be incurred to achieve only trivial and theoretical impacts on global warming.

Published in USA