Today: 19.Jun.2021

Michael Dittmar, physicist CERN, Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire: - The worries about existing and potential problems with our oil, gas and coal supplies for our industrial based way of living have certainly increased.

However, people enthusiastic about large scale technology, especially with some background in physics, are pointing quickly either to nuclear energy or to large scale solar power projects as possible solutions to such worries. Such views are supported by most economists and politicians who propose that one only needs to invest trillions of dollars to manage potentially existing problems with our fossil fuel based energy civilization. It is assumed that the intelligent investment of money will be sufficient to solve the problems with nuclear fusion and make it available either directly on our planet or indirectly using solar energy. Such views about the future use of energy are often lacking the relevant facts about today’s energy use and existing technological constraints. Instead, the preferred form of discussions seems to be dominated by theoretical and hypothetical ideas about unproven concepts with unknown capital costs.

Published in Switzerland

The world is full of scientists, medical professionals and engineers who have made tremendous contributions to making the world a lot better AND explaining it to the public in an interesting way. Alan Waltar is one such person. Please take time to read each of the slides in this presentation. There is a lot we can learn.

Published in USA

Dennis Normile, writer for www.sciencemag.org, website for AAAS, American association for the Advancement of Science: Most of the world is turning its back on burning coal to produce electricity, but not Japan. The nation has fired up at least eight new coal power plants in the past 2 years and has plans for an additional 36 over the next decade—the biggest planned coal power expansion in any developed nation (not including China and India).

Published in Japan

World Council on Isotopes, 2016 China, Japan, Korea Meeting: The 2016 China-Japan-Korea (CJK) Meeting took place on January 21-22, in Seoul, Korea. Since it was first held in 2003 with a purpose of fostering communication and cooperation among the three countries, it has provided the opportunity for those countries to discuss and exchange on radiation technology and radioisotopes. The global radioisotope (RI) market has shown progressive growth, with expectations to reach 8 billion USD in 2017. Among the whole RI market, medical RIs account for about 80%. In particular, Mo-99, the mother of Tc-99m, covers more than 80% of all medical RIs.

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