Today: 25.Feb.2020

Nuclear Africa, Kelvin Kemm: What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine involves the application of radioactive substances to people, in both the diagnosis and the treatment of disease. In nuclear medicine procedures, radioisotopes are combined with other chemicals or pharmaceutical compounds to form radiopharmaceuticals. They migrate through the body and localise in specific organs or cellular receptors. This property provides nuclear medicine with the ability to image the extent of a disease process in the body, based on the cellular function and physiology, rather than relying only on physical changes in the tissue anatomy.

Kelvin Kemm, nuclear physicist, Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and CEO of Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: This interview with NEWZROOM AFRIKA describes the benefits of nuclear energy and nuclear medicine for the continent of Africa and countries everywhere. Dr. Kemm is one of the best spokespersons for a peaceful world with plentiful nuclear energy, nuclear medicine and nuclear science. It is very helpful for many countries that NEWZROOM AFRIKA is providing this interview.

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: South Africa has had very successful nuclear energy and radioisotope production programs for more than 30 years. They have expertise in all aspects of licensing, operating and managing these facilities. The country is helping other African countries get ready for nuclear power and nuclear medicine. The United States and France may not be available to help with the next generation of nuclear plants. So they will probably have to look elsewhere for nuclear plant design and construction. South Africa is a leading example of what other countries will have to do to have nuclear power.

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: South Africa possesses the world’s richest thorium mine, Steenkampskraal in the Western Cape. The mine was discovered in the late 1940s and produces valuable Rare Earth materials, plus thorium. Research into using thorium in nuclear reactors was carried out in the United States in the late 1950s and also in Germany and the United Kingdom in the early to mid-1960s. Most of the thorium used in all of these reactors came from the Steenkampskraal mine.

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • John Shanahan, Editor of allaboutenergy.net, Civil Engineer,…
  • The American Nuclear Society gives no indication…
  • These people and organizations advocate use of…
  • These people and organizations advocate use of…
  • Nuclear power is "irreplaceable" and international cooperation…