Today: 03.Mar.2021

Geoffrey Rothwell, Ph.D. Economics, Principal Economist at OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: This book is a unique introduction to the economics and economic uncertainties of nuclear electricity generation. It examines nuclear power’s complex relationships among financial, operational and regulatory cost drivers. It does so as a research monograph and as a textbook by modelling and explaining one of the world’s most opaque technologies using microeconomics, statistics and cost engineering.

Published in France

Charles Till and Yoon Chang provide an excellent history of the development of the Integral Fast Reactor Project and the political decisions to stop this outstanding energy technology in the United States. The world is going to use this technology, while the United States is being deprived due to the ideological decisions of a few.

Published in USA

Leon Louw, lawyer, economist, Executive Director of Free Market Foundation in South Africa, Director - Regulatory Affairs for Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd and Bonne Posma, engineer, Founder and CEO, Saminco (USA) specializing in electric propulsion systems for off-road vehicles and underground mining conveyances with operations in China, South Africa and USA, principal shareholder in Liquid Coal, Inc. (USA) . The nature and risks of nuclear radiation are widely misunderstood from the most advanced society to the least sophisticated societies. Many view nuclear radiation as they view ghosts and spirits. People who fear what they regard as ominous phenomena generally have difficulty explaining why. This facilitates the promotion by scaremongers of irrational fear. During the era of nuclear weapons testing, radiation fear mushroomed. It endures despite the fact that, for over half a century, 450 water-moderated nuclear power plants delivered millions of terawatt hours of electricity without a single radiation fatality.

Shawn Ritenour: Professor of Economics, Fellow of The Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation: Realism Necessary - The idea that any economist can predict the quantitative effect of an action today on the economy three hundred years from now would be laughable if not taken so seriously by politicians seeking excuses for policies to which they’re already committed on other grounds.

Published in USA
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