Today: 29.Oct.2020

Brian Wang: China already generates 60% more electricity than the USA in 2018. China plans to double this by 2030. China wants to increase from 3-4% nuclear power for electricity to 10%. This will mean 300 GW of electricity in 2030. This would be about triple the US generation of nuclear electricity. Starting in 2010, China is now working on two very different thorium based molten salt reactor programs. One is based on liquid fuel, the other on molten salt cooled solid fuel. Both are designed for specific application areas.

Published in China

John Shanahan, civil engineer: Nuclear power in the United States has been fighting against well funded and well organized anti-nuclear power organizations and their political leaders. Incredibly, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is holding back development of advanced nuclear power technologies by making licensing unnecessarily slow and expensive. In the 1960s a nuclear plant could be licensed in less than five years. Now the NRC says licensing new technologies could take more than a quarter of a century. North American companies are taking their new technologies to Asia to develop and license. Russia and China are moving ahead as fast as possible to develop new nuclear technologies. How can American citizens let this happen?

Published in USA

Alan Waltar, nuclear engineer, Past President of the American Nuclear Society: The majority of our citizens are aware of the contributions of nuclear technology to the production of electricity via commercial nuclear power plants. But most are unaware that the impact of this technology is even greater for non-power applications. The world of medicine, agriculture, and modern industry has been substantially improved by the harnessing of radioisotopes, and new applications continue to make major humanitarian contributions to our quality of life.

Published in USA

World Nuclear News: Moltex Energy USA LLC has been awarded USD2.55 million of US federal funding to develop technologies that will be capable of shortening Stable Salt Reactor construction timelines to under three years.

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