Today: 12.Jun.2021

S. Fred Singer, professor emeritus at the University of Virginia and director of the Science and Environmental Policy Project. Gerald E. Marsh, a retired physicist from Argonne National Laboratory - Many people believe that wind and solar energy are essential for replacing nonrenewable fossil fuels. They also believe that wind and solar are unique in providing energy that’s carbon-free and inexhaustible. A closer look shows that such beliefs are based on illusions and wishful thinking.

Published in USA

Eric Jelinski, Nuclear/Chemical/Mechanical Engineer: From the beginning of use of commercial nuclear power in the 1960s, scientists and engineers knew that the long term future of nuclear power depended on recycling of uranium spent fuel. Anti-nuclear organizations managed to get several U.S. presidents to stop development of advanced nuclear power technologies that can use recycled spent nuclear fuel efficiently. France, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. worked on developing recycling technologies practically from the beginning. France, Russia, China, Korea are going ahead with developing spent nuclear fuel technology. They will be well rewarded. Those who bend to anti-nuclear organizations will be held back at significant price.

Published in Canada

John Shanahan, Dr. Ing., Civil Engineer: With financial and management situations of Toshiba, Westinghouse, Areva, and GE in the nuclear power business, the world's capability to build new nuclear power plants has obviously been set back. China, Russia and South Korea are now the leading sources of new nuclear power plants. How France and the United States might make a come back is not known at this time. This is a simple estimate of how long it might take to have nuclear become 50% of the world's electric generating capacity. The conclusion is that it will probably take several hundred years to get to 50% nuclear electric generating capacity. This has significant implications for energy planning.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Eric Jelinski, Nuclear/Chemical/Mechanical Engineer: From the beginning of use of commercial nuclear power in the 1960s, scientists and engineers knew that the long term future of nuclear power depended on recycling of uranium spent fuel. Anti-nuclear organizations managed to get several U.S. presidents to stop development of advanced nuclear power technologies that can use recycled spent nuclear fuel efficiently. France, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. worked on developing recycling technologies practically from the beginning. France, Russia, China, Korea are going ahead with developing spent nuclear fuel technology. They will be well rewarded. Those who bend to anti-nuclear organizations will be held back at significant price.

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