Today: 10.Aug.2020

British Geological Survey. During the last ice age, lots of sea water was stored in ice sheets and glaciers and sea level was, on average, more than 130 metres lower than it is today.

Shrinking Ice, Rising Seas. Sea level rise is an indicator that our planet is warming. When ice on land, such as mountain glaciers or the ice sheets of Greenland or Antarctica, melts, that water contributes to sea level rise

Whatever the cause of sea level change may be in the future, there is nothing mankind can do to control it. He must "go with the flow" and move to higher ground, if the level is rising. No king or president can protect people living close to sea level when it is rising. In the past, civilizations responded wisely. Will people today expect their government to protect them and their property from rising seas?

Judith Curry, Professor, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA

The framing of the climate change problem by the UNFCCC/IPCC and the early articulation of a preferred policy option has marginalized research on broader issues surrounding climate variability and change and stifled the development of a broader range of policy options. The wickedness of the climate change problem provides much scope for disagreement among reasonable and intelligent people. Arguably the biggest problem with climate policy has been an overly narrow set of narratives and policy options.

Robert Bryce is a senior fellow at the Center for Energy Policy and the Environment at the Manhattan Institute. In theory, the March 11, 2011, disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant should have bolstered environmentalists’ opposition to new nuclear-energy projects. But in the wake of the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl, some of the world’s leading Greens have done just the opposite: they have come out in favor of nuclear power.

Published in USA

Judith Curry, PhD Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Professor at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology. Over 30 year career in atmospheric science. The magnitude of climate effects caused by using fossil fuels is questionable. Physical data does not agree with the climate models and most likely will be less than they predict. .

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