Today: 27.Sep.2020

Jon Boone, environmentalist, naturalist, bird and nature artist, wind energy expert: QUESTIONS • Why did the Dutch stop using their windmills to grind their grain and pump water to reclaim their land from the sea--as soon as the steam engine was invented? • Why are sailing vessels used almost entirely for recreation today, rather than for commercial purposes? • What is the difference between energy and power? • Why must electricity supply be matched to demand at all times? • What are the implications for wind technology given that any power generated is a function of the cube of the wind speed along a narrow range of wind velocities (that is, a wind turbine doesn't begin to work until the wind speeds hits 9-mph and maxes out when the wind speeds hit around 34-mph)? • Why has steady, controllable, precision power been the basis of modern life?

Published in USA

Calvin Beisner, Cornwall Alliance: Selling nuclear by its lack of CO2 emissions has been a dumb idea all along, and the Greens are certainly not going to continue “supporting” it once it becomes clear we really must begin using a lot more of it.

Published in USA

James Conca, Geochemist: In January, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Advanced Nuclear Technology Act of 2017, HR 590, that is intended “to foster civilian research and development of advanced nuclear energy technologies and enhance the licensing and commercial deployment of such technologies. At the same time, the latest version of the Interim Consolidated Storage Act was introduced in the House. This bill would create one or more interim storage facilities to hold spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from all the nation’s nuclear power plants and would allow the Energy Department to contract for temporary used nuclear fuel storage facilities. These bills address two of the most important recommendations made in 2011 by then President Obama’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future (the BRC),”

Published in USA

Catrina Rorke, R Street: With the recently announced planned retirements of nuclear facilities in Illinois and California, nearly 10 percent of the U.S. nuclear-energy fleet either already has closed or is scheduled to close within the next 16 years. Worse, there are no plans to replace them or add new plants. Similar in Germany and soon also in Switzerland. France wisely planned to replace their nuclear power plants. Russia and China are going ahead with nuclear power for the long term future.

Published in USA
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