Today: 08.Jul.2020

Barry Brook, Faculty of Science, Engineering & Technology, U. of Tasmania, Australia & Staffan Qvist, Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, Uppsala University, Sweden: This documents the excellent French and Swedish nuclear power plant construction programs in the 1960s to 1990s. It then extrapolates to a prediction that the whole world could be on 100 % nuclear power within 25 - 34 years. This must assume that the rest of the world has similar government support and cooperation, similar stable, honest leadership, sound economies, industrial capabilities, education systems, etc. and that the construction companies and nuclear fuel demands for France and Sweden can be quickly increased to those of the whole world. It assumes that the world will use the same nuclear technology as the Swedish and French programs of the 1970s to 90s. In reality, it may take several hundred years to replace 50% of fossil fuels with advanced nuclear technologies that still need development and testing.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

John Shanahan, Dr. Ing., Civil Engineer: With financial and management situations of Toshiba, Westinghouse, Areva, and GE in the nuclear power business, the world's capability to build new nuclear power plants has obviously been set back. China, Russia and South Korea are now the leading sources of new nuclear power plants. How France and the United States might make a come back is not known at this time. This is a simple estimate of how long it might take to have nuclear become 50% of the world's electric generating capacity. The conclusion is that it will probably take several hundred years to get to 50% nuclear electric generating capacity. This has significant implications for energy planning.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Debalina Ghoshal, Gatestone Institute International Policy Council: China is working the most to expand the use of nuclear power on land and sea. In April 2016, reports began coming in that China has plans to build floating nuclear power plants in the South China Sea. Final assembly of the reactor is reported to start in coastal city of Huludao, in Liaoning province, and will be built by Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industry Co Ltd, a unit of China Shipbuilding Industry Corp (CSIC). China's 2016 nuclear plan, a component of the China's 13th five-year plan, is evidently to complete 58 nuclear reactors by 2020 and build another 100 gigawatt-sized reactors by 2030.

Published in Fission - uranium fuel

Theodore (Ted) Rockwell retired founding partner and board member, MPR Associates, died on March 31, 2013. He was born on June 26, 1922, in Chicago and earned MS and BS degrees in chemical engineering at Princeton University. In 1960 he was awarded an honorary Sc.D. degree for contributions to the development of nuclear power. Ted was a prolific writer and speaker on technical topics, wrote popular interest articles, and established a blog, “Learning about Energy.” He edited the Reactor Shielding Manual, the fundamental reference used worldwide since its initial publication in 1956. The closing words on Ted’s life are also his own: “I like to stir up spirited discussions on important issues. Socially, I like to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.”

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