Today: 04.Mar.2021

Anthony Watts, publisher of wattsupwiththat.com Watts Up With That? This isn’t the first time such wild calls for criminalization of contrary climate opinion have been made, in fact, it goes back to 2014: Lawrence Torcello, a liberal arts professor at Rochester Institute of Technology, NY, writes in an essay at The Conversation that climate scientists who fail to communicate the correct message about “global warming” should face trial for “criminal negligence.” A commenter on his article went even further to suggest that I should be sent to the war crimes tribunal in the Hague for having a different opinion on climate

Published in USA

William Happer, physicist, Princeton University, USA, W A Wijngaarden, physicist, York University, Canada: William Happer's view is that human emissions likely dominate the increase of atmospheric CO2 over the past century. There is enormous complexity of CO2 in the atmosphere, the land and the oceans. One has to wonder if four coupled linear equations are too simple with respect to reality. He thinks that growing CO2 levels are a great benefit to life on Earth and to humanity.

Published in USA

Roy Spencer, meteorologist. While 2020 will be at or near record-warmth globally, this is not something we should be particularly alarmed about. The recent claim of the first 100 deg. F temperature reading above the Arctic Circle in Siberia is incorrect; it was 100 deg. F in Ft. Yukon, Alaska way back in 1915. The town in Siberia measuring 100 deg. F (Verkhoyansk) is notable for its exceedingly cold winters and hot summers, holding the Guinness World Record for the largest observed seasonal temperature swing: an astonishing 189 deg. F.

Published in USA

Roy Spencer, meteorologist. While 2020 will be at or near record-warmth globally, this is not something we should be particularly alarmed about. The recent claim of the first 100 deg. F temperature reading above the Arctic Circle in Siberia is incorrect; it was 100 deg. F in Ft. Yukon, Alaska way back in 1915. The town in Siberia measuring 100 deg. F (Verkhoyansk) is notable for its exceedingly cold winters and hot summers, holding the Guinness World Record for the largest observed seasonal temperature swing: an astonishing 189 deg. F.