Today: 04.Aug.2020

Roy Spencer, meteorologist. While 2020 will be at or near record-warmth globally, this is not something we should be particularly alarmed about. The recent claim of the first 100 deg. F temperature reading above the Arctic Circle in Siberia is incorrect; it was 100 deg. F in Ft. Yukon, Alaska way back in 1915. The town in Siberia measuring 100 deg. F (Verkhoyansk) is notable for its exceedingly cold winters and hot summers, holding the Guinness World Record for the largest observed seasonal temperature swing: an astonishing 189 deg. F.

Published in USA

Roy Spencer, meteorologist. While 2020 will be at or near record-warmth globally, this is not something we should be particularly alarmed about. The recent claim of the first 100 deg. F temperature reading above the Arctic Circle in Siberia is incorrect; it was 100 deg. F in Ft. Yukon, Alaska way back in 1915. The town in Siberia measuring 100 deg. F (Verkhoyansk) is notable for its exceedingly cold winters and hot summers, holding the Guinness World Record for the largest observed seasonal temperature swing: an astonishing 189 deg. F.

Nick DeIuliis, The Hill: While the novel coronavirus has triggered a global debate on how to balance short-term infection rates with long-term economic viability, a crucial epiphany is slowly emerging through the deliberations. Society realizes that the “Church of Climate” has propagated an epic fraud upon individual rights, taxpayers, and free enterprise.

Published in USA

Ole Humlum, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Oslo, Norway: According to the instrumental temperature record (since about 1850), 2019 was a very warm year, but cooler than 2016. Since 2004, when detailed recording of ocean temperatures began, the global oceans above 1900 m depth have, on average, warmed somewhat. Since 1972, however, snow extent has been largely stable. Data from tide gauges all over the world suggest an average global sea-level rise of 1–1.5 mm/year, while the satellite record suggests a rise of about 3.2 mm/year, or more. The noticeable difference in rate (a ratio of at least 1:2) between the two data sets still has no broadly accepted explanation. The focus in this report is on observations, and not on output from numerical models.

Published in Norway
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